Major General S.L. Bhatia Oration, 2020

Nov 28,2020

The Division of Health and Humanities, St. John's Research Institute and the Department of History of Medicine, St. John's Medical College is happy to invite you to the Maj. Gen. SL Bhatia Oration on 28th November, 2020.

This year's oration will be held through a zoom webinar.
You can register for the webinar athttps://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ZRTeoM8zTH-oAw_E4TtElA
Upon registration, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar

The oration is a tribute to Maj Gen SL Bhatia, the first Indian Dean of the Grant Medical College, an eminent scholar and the first Professor of the History of Medicine at St. John’s Medical College, Bangalore.

This year's speaker is Dr. Erica Charters, Associate Professor of Global History and the History of Medicine, Director Centre for the History of Science, Medicine and Technology, University of Oxford. Her talk will be on "Eighteenth-Century British War and The Making of Modern Medicine". This talk will examine the ways in which the warfare shaped modern medicine, particularly the emergence of statistical approaches to disease that have become familiar to us through COVID -19.

Date: November 28, 2020

Time: 7:00 pm IST on Zoom

 

About the Orator: Erica Charters researches the history of war and disease, particularly in colonial contexts.  Her publications include Disease, War, and the Imperial State and, most recently, The History of Science and Medicine in the Context of COVID-19.  Her current work focuses on manpower during the eighteenth century, examining the history of bodies as well as the history of methods used to measure and enhance bodies, labour, and population as a whole, including the history of statistics.  Her work examines the history of tropical medicine, global health, and the development of quantitative methodologies in a range of disciplines.

More on the Topic: While Britain’s eighteenth-century wars – especially when fought in overseas colonies - resulted in high rates of disease among troops, warfare also encouraged the development of practices and methodologies we now associate with modern scientific medicine.  This talk will examine the ways in which warfare shaped modern medicine, particularly the emergence of statistical approaches to disease that have become familiar to us through COVID-19.