Association of dairy consumption with metabolic syndrome, hypertension and diabetes in 147?812 individuals from 21 countries

Authors : http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2060-1332Balaji Bhavadharini1, Mahshid Dehghan1, http://orcid.org/0000-0001-6879-7675Andrew Mente1,2, Sumathy Rangarajan1, Patrick Sheridan1, Viswanathan Mohan3,4, Romaina Iqbal5, Rajeev Gupta6, Scott Lear7, Edelweiss Wentzel-Viljoen8, Alvaro Avezum9, Patricio Lopez-Jaramillo10, Prem Mony11, Ravi Prasad Varma12, Rajesh Kumar13, Jephat Chifamba14, Khalid F Alhabib15, Noushin Mohammadifard16, Aytekin Oguz17, Fernando Lanas18, Dorota Rozanska19, Kristina Bengtsson Bostrom20, Khalid Yusoff21, Lungiswa P Tsolkile22, Antonio Dans23, http://orcid.org/0000-0003-3378-2646Afzalhussein Yusufali24, Andres Orlandini25, http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5395-3273Paul Poirier26, Rasha Khatib27, Bo Hu28, http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7565-762XLi Wei29, Lu Yin28, Ai Deeraili30, Karen Yeates31, Rita Yusuf32, Noorhassim Ismail33, Dariush Mozaffarian34, Koon Teo1,2,35, Sonia S Anand1,2,35, Salim Yusuf1,2,35

Publication Year : 2020 Apr

Abstract :

Abstract

Objective Our aims were to assess the association of dairy intake with prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) (cross-sectionally) and with incident hypertension and incident diabetes (prospectively) in a large multinational cohort study.

Methods The Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) study is a prospective epidemiological study of individuals aged 35 and 70 years from 21 countries on five continents, with a median follow-up of 9.1 years. In the cross-sectional analyses, we assessed the association of dairy intake with prevalent MetS and its components among individuals with information on the five MetS components (n=112?922). For the prospective analyses, we examined the association of dairy with incident hypertension (in 57?547 individuals free of hypertension) and diabetes (in 131?481 individuals free of diabetes).

Results In cross-sectional analysis, higher intake of total dairy (at least two servings/day compared with zero intake; OR 0.76, 95%?CI 0.71 to 0.80, p-trend<0 p-trend=0.0005), p-trend=0.13). p-trend=0.02) p-trend=0.01).>

Conclusions Higher intake of whole fat (but not low fat) dairy was associated with a lower prevalence of MetS and most of its component factors, and with a lower incidence of hypertension and diabetes. Our findings should be evaluated in large randomized trials of the effects of whole fat dairy on the risks of MetS, hypertension, and diabetes.

https://drc.bmj.com/content/8/1/e000826